Resolution 12: The Full Explanation Part Three

Resolution 12: The Full Explanation Part Three

 In the first two parts, we looked at how Rangers were granted a licence to participate in the European Champions League in 2011.
 In order to fully understand the role the SFA played in this, we have to first look a little more into their, er, unique style of governance. Their reluctance to answer questions on the licencing matter, and their stubborn refusal to explain their actions during this period has led to a general feeling amongst supporters that they have always been like this and we’ll never change it.
 We might not be able to change it, after all, when Jim Farry was found out to be a cheat, they just replaced him with someone else who would carry on the traditions of the governing body, and his removal after a tenacious battle launched by Fergus McCann may ultimately have been only a pyrrhic victory.
When you’ve read these expalnantions Resolution 12, I hope you’ll see that the SFa needs to be broken up and a new body put in its place.
Here’s why….
  The SFA simply do not feel that they HAVE to answer supporters’ questions no matter how strong the argument that they do so. They are answerable only to member clubs which explains their stubborn attitude to answering any questions from fans, supporters or, as in the Res12 case, supporters with a shareholding in a member club.
Let’s be clear here: it is the SFA, and their style of governance that is the issue. That it concerns Rangers is irrelevant. Had the SFA appeared to favour any club in this way, it’s still just as important they clarify their actions in matters of importance to supporters who are the life blood of the game.
Obtaining clarification itself, regardless of what it reveals, or who is implicated  is what Res12 seeks, in order to send out a message
to the SFA (and SPFL) that their accountability does not stop at the Boardroom door of its members’ clubs but includes their supporters, the ultimate funders in Scotland of our game.
Image result for football without fans is nothing
There are several matters requiring clarification regarding the processing of the RFC UEFA Licence application in 2011, in respect of both SFAactions and their motives.
Before that let’s look at the jurisdiction of SFA responsibilities.
It’s the SFA’s job to make sure that all the rules have been followed, and nobody is telling fibbers in order to get a shot at the millions of pounds up for grabs in the champions League.
Just so you know, this is how they describe themselves on the SFA website…
The Scottish FA exists to promote, foster and develop the game at all levels in this
country.
Founded in 1873, Scottish football’s governing body has recently undergone the most radical changes in its history, enabling us to lead the game into a new era. The  launch of our strategic plan Scotland United: A 2020 Vision outlines the vision, values and goals that underpin the organisation and its many facets.
The plan encompasses four strategic pillars:
• Perform and Win
• Strong Quality Growth
• Better financial returns
Respected and Trusted to Lead 
The bit in bold is interesting, and we’re going to have a look at whether they’ve lived up to that particular objective with regard to the processing of the UEFA licence in a subsequent article next week  given there is a lot to digest and digestive capacity may be overloaded elsewhere.
Over the next few days, we’re going to pause and reflect and what we have learned so far, and feel free to add any questions or observations that you feel are valid.
A Merry Christmas to all E Tims Readers.